Opportunities

 
Changing Spaces: Movement, Posture and Form: Dancing Our Way Through a Global Pandemic
Thursday, July 9, 2020
4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Eastern / 3:30 – 5:00 Central / 2:30 – 4:00 Mountain / 1:30 – 3:00 Pacific

Facilitated by James Frazier, Dean, College of Fine Arts, Florida State University and Onye Ozuzu, Dean, College of the Arts, University of Florida

In Movement, Posture and Form: Dancing Our Way Through a Global Pandemic,  Dean James Frazier, College of Fine Arts, Florida State University will host a dialogue to explore how dance and the performing arts are being affected by the COVID-19 pandemic; how it will affect faculty and students in the classroom and studio in fall 2020; and how it could impact international  opportunities for faculty and student exchange over the next five years. Join us.

Inspiring Civic Engagement through Theatre - Navigating the New Play Exchange
Thursday, July 16, 2020
4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Eastern / 3:30 – 5:00 Central / 2:30 – 4:00 Mountain / 1:30 – 3:00 Pacific


To study Shakespeare, you go to the Riverside edition. To study contemporary drama, you need the New Play Exchange.

The New Play Exchange is the world’s largest digital library of plays by living writers. With more than 35,000 scripts by more than 8,500 writers – and growing each day – the utility of this tool in our current educational climate is limitless. In this hour-long webinar designed specifically for Deans and their Directors of Theatre, the Architect and Chief Evangelist for the NPX, Gwydion Suilebhan, will share how the New Play Exchange can be used to study theater, especially in a remote-learning environment. In addition to providing access to this growing canon, students and educators can use the NPX to gain access to professional playwrights, dramaturgs, and other theater-makers, and use the robust search functionality to inspire civic engagement on a range of topics from climate change to #BlackLivesMatter.

National New Play Network is the country’s alliance of professional theaters that collaborate in innovative ways to develop, produce, and extend the life of new plays. In 2015, NNPN launched the New Play Exchange, and in 2019 created an Education subscription that uses IP whitelisting technology to make this revolutionary tool available to students around the world. We are pleased to offer a new webinar to specifically highlight the uses of the NPX for educators.

Click here to register
and add to your calendar now.

Changing Spaces: Re-thinking Arts and Architecture Facilities and Resources in the Age of COVID-19
Thursday, July 23, 2020
4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Eastern / 3:30 – 5:00 Central / 2:30 – 4:00 Mountain / 1:30 – 3:00 Pacific

Facilitated by Royce Smith, Dean, College of Arts & Architecture, Montana State University

As universities that plan to incorporate some aspects of face-to-face instruction in the fall work through the associated logistical, epidemiological and institutional challenges, many of us have been asked to rethink our teaching, to reconceptualize our resources and facilities and to adapt teaching to health-focused (as opposed to solely pedagogical) priorities. As we navigate the new realities presented to us by the COVID-19 pandemic, how can we employ the adaptability, flexibility and innovative spirit that has always characterized what we do to serve us during these unprecedented times? How might we rethink space, teaching and interactivity in ways that our sensitive both to health and well-being and student success? This collaborative discussion will allow us to brainstorm some of the institutional solutions that our members have established, rely on one another as a sounding board for ongoing problems related to fall planning and share current information and guidance related to best-of instructional practices in the age of COVID-19. Join us.

Watch for information about future ICFAD Discusses.


Previous Opportunities

 
This Time Has to Be Different: What Are Arts Colleges Doing about Racism?
Thursday, June 18, 2020 / 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Eastern / 3:30 – 5:00 Central / 2:30 – 4:00 Mountain / 1:30 – 3:00 Pacific
 

Proudly sponsored by

The fire this time? Like you, many arts leaders have been watching with sorrow and astonishment as the events of protest and police confrontation unfolded these past two weeks in the wake of George Floyd’s death. Like you, many of us feel that this time has to be different and cannot just be another instance of collective rage followed by inured acceptance.  We need more than talk of social justice. We need social action. Please join our community of university arts leaders as we share creative ways to meet this moment and support our students and friends of color. This discussion was facilitated by Charles O’Connor, Dean, Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts, University of Nebraska – Lincoln and B. Stephen Carpenter, II, Dean, College of Arts and Architecture, The Pennsylvania State University. Suggested reading and listening: We Cannot Return to Normal and Black Like Me, past, present and future: Behind the Stratford Festival Curtain

Navigating Extreme Uncertainty to Reimagine Higher Education
Friday, June 12, 2020 | 8 – 10 a.m. PDT | 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. EDT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created extreme uncertainty for schools leaders, faced with consequential decisions at multiple levels. Regardless of when and how schools reopen in the Fall, the coronavirus will require us to think differently about how we approach our work and it will challenge many assumptions about our education system. In this experiential workshop led by Stanford d.school educators from the University Innovation Fellows program, your campus team will explore tools that combine human centered design and futures thinking to help craft clarity out of ambiguity towards reimagining higher education.

Defining Boundaries in a Virtual World

Tuesday, June 9, 2020 | 2 p.m. EDT

Some of the impact of COVID-19 is visible and well-documented, but critics have suggested that the pandemic could have repercussions for our democratic societies that are far less visible. Decision-making by governments in times of social upheaval is not always immediate or transparent. This makes us consider whether democratic processes should be subjected to more scrutiny. Protecting privacy during turbulent times as people utilize virtual meetings for both professional and private connections is increasingly problematic. How can educational institutions and the arts work together to protect the health and safety, economy, and privacy of those they serve? The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted health practices, the global economy, and the way we live. The arts in higher education have been severely affected, with institutions around the world slowly reopening for fall 2020 and planning being developed for new ways to teach and learn. Some of the impact of COVID-19 is visible and well-documented, but critics have suggested that the pandemic could have repercussions for our democratic societies that are far less visible. Decision-making by governments in times of social upheaval is not always immediate or transparent. This makes us consider whether democratic processes should be subjected to more scrutiny. Protecting privacy during turbulent times as people utilize virtual meetings for both professional and private connections is increasingly problematic. How can educational institutions and the arts work together to protect the health and safety, economy, and privacy of those they serve? This virtual conversation was moderated by David White of the University of the Arts London and featured three speakers: Ariel GuersenzvaigKarin Harrasser and Hael Kobayashi